7 Ways to Make Your API More Successful

By , December 10, 2012 8:35 pm

The purpose of a content API is to make the content available to its audience in the most useful and efficient way possible. To be a useful API, it needs to help the developers make their jobs easier. This could mean a wide range of things, including making it easier to dig into the API, allowing for greater flexibility in the responses, improved performance and efficiency for both the API and its consumer. Below are seven development techniques (all of which are part of the NPR API) that can help content providers improve the usefulness and efficiency of their APIs on both sides of the track. These techniques played a critical role in the success of the API which now delivers over 700 million stories per month to its users (more stats on the NPR API coming soon on our Inside NPR.org blog).

Be Flexible: Support Multiple Output Formats
Making the API as available and accessible as possible is very important in drawing developers to use it. So providing the content in a range of formats will increase the likelihood that the developer can rely on existing libraries and make as few changes to the code as possible.

The NPR API offers eight different output formats in an effort to improve efficiency for the developers. Above is a graph demonstrating the distribution of requests for each of the formats in July of 2009. As you can see, the majority of requests are to our proprietary XML markup (NPRML). That also means that almost 50% of the requests, or about 20M requests per month, use the other seven formats. In offering offering these other non-proprietary XML formats, the API is able to support developers that may have existing applications that pull in content in one of these standardized format, such as MediaRSS or Atom.

To make it even easier for people to use the API, NPR also launched with JavaScript and HTML “widgets”. The other six formats require more sophistication in order to put the content in an application or website. The widgets, however, are pre-designed feeds of NPR content (based on the developer’s selections) that can be easily dropped into a page.

Be Efficient: Handle Partial Response
This concept is now starting to get some more traction, now that Google announced partial response handling for some of their APIs. NPR’s API also makes extensive us of this feature because it really is tremendously valuable to the provider and the consumer of the API. For example, NPR stories contain a wide variety of fields and assets in the API. If the consumer is forced to handle the complete document, even if they only want a few fields, they have to endure all of the latency issues from the API itself as well as the additional processing power needed to handle the undesired fields.

As a result, NPR incorporated a “fields” parameter (the same parameter name used by Google) that can be used in the query string to limit the resulting document to only the fields of interest. This approach creates documents that are smaller and much more efficient. Overwhelmingly, more requests to the NPR API contain the fields parameter than those that do not (in fact, it isn’t even close).

Here are a few examples of how the same query to the NPR API, returning the same stories, delivers different documents based on the fields parameter (you will need to register for your own NPR API key to execute these queries):

http://api.npr.org/query?id=1001&apiKey=your_api_key

http://api.npr.org/query?id=1001&fields=title&apiKey=your_api_key

http://api.npr.org/query?id=1001&fields=title,teaser,text,image,audio&apiKey=your_api_key

An extension of partial response is to allow the developer to specify the number of items they would like in return. Some APIs return a fixed number of results, which can bloat the document just like the extra fields can. The NPR API, to counter this, allows the developer to pass in the number of results desired (with a fixed ceiling for any given request). To dig deeper in the results, we incorporated a “pagination” feature in the API. Here are some examples of how to control the number of stories:

http://api.npr.org/query?id=1001&numResults=5&apiKey=your_api_key

http://api.npr.org/query?id=1001&numResults=5&startNum=6&apiKey=your_api_key

Give Them Control: Allow for Customizable Output Markup (“Remapping Fields”)
As mentioned in the transform section, if the API can easily serve existing applications that expect specific markup, it potentially increases adoption and improves developer efficiency. To extend that functionality, the NPR API offers a function that we call “Remap” which essentially lets the developer modify the name of one or more XML elements or attributes in the output at request time. This is done in the query string and the API transforms the markup accordingly in real-time. Here are a few examples:

In this example, the remap parameter changes the story title to < specialTitle >:

http://api.npr.org/query?id=1001&remap=list.story.title:specialTitle&apiKey=your_api_key

In this example, the remap parameter changes the story title to < specialTitle > and it changes the image caption to < imageCaption >:

http://api.npr.org/query?id=1001&remap=list.story.title:specialTitle,list.story.image.caption:imageCaption&apiKey=your_api_key

In this example, the remap parameter changes the audio element’s id attribute to be named audioId:

http://api.npr.org/query?id=1001&remap=list.story.audio~id:audioId&apiKey=your_api_key

Another benefit to remap (which we have fortunately not had to use) is that it can be used to handle backward compatibility as the API grows and changes. NPR’s philosophy is to make sure that upgrades do not adversely affect existing functionality. That said, if an element or attribute does need to change, we could execute apache rewrites for all old API calls and have the remap function applied to have the output match that of the old markup. Alternatively, the developer could simply modify their API call instead of having to change their codebase to match the markup changes. (Although we do not intend to change existing markup, if we do, we would advise developers to upgrade their code accordingly. That said, rather than having the applications fail during the transition, remap could be used to temporarily handle requests until the full codebase can be upgraded).

Be Fast: Set Up a Comprehensive Caching Architecture
Performance is another critical aspect of APIs when it comes to enticing developers to use them. After all, if the API is sluggish, developers may not want to depend their application on it.

Smart caching of queries and results can really improve the speed of the system. NPR has implemented several layers of caching for the API, as follows:

  • Base XML – Caching the full document for each item is important to prevent the system from executing disk I/O before doing any transform. We cache the Base XML first in memory and secondarily as XML files to eliminate the need to access our content database.
  • Full Query Results – When compiling the list of items to be returned for any given story, it is important to cache the full list because popular applications that have many concurrent users (such as NPR Addict) are very likely to execute the same queries and expect the same results. The cached result is a single document containing the full list of all items and the full base XML for each.
  • Transformed Query Results – The calling application, such as NPR Addict, expects the document to be transformed to fit the application’s needs. So, the results that get cached in Full Query Results may get transformed to MediaRSS while simultaneously removing extraneous fields. Caching the final results that get returned to the calling application enable fastest performance without compromising the system’s ability to use the other caching layers to produce different versions of the document.

npr_architecture_diagram_490
Click here for an enlargement of this architecture diagram

Give Them Tools: Provide a Query UI with the Documentation
There are two truths about developers and documentation: the former always expects the latter, but seldom uses it. Of course, you cannot have an API without providing comprehensive documentation. That said, offering a simple user interface that helps developers get what they need from the API wil increase adoption and make life easier for them.

NPR’s API launched with a tool that we call the Query Generator. This tool exposes more than 6500 query-able IDs, methods for controlling the output format, fields to be returned, date and search restrictions, pagination, and more. Using the interface, the developer can select their options and have the tool create the query string for their API request. The developer can also see the results of that query inline before commiting it to their application. Almost exclusively, developers (including the NPR staff) use this tool to create queries, rather than reading the documentation.

Be Open: Eliminate Rate Limiting
Throttling or limiting access to APIs is an inherent disincentive for developers. Moreover, it is actually a detriment to the API provider. After all, the purpose of the API is to grant access to the content. If a given developer can only call the API 5000 times a day, and that developer creates a hugely popular application, the rate-limiting will inherently stifle the developer and the viral nature of the API.

Granted, most APIs use rate-limiting or tiered access levels to allow business people to control the graduation of API users. This seems counter-productive to me though. The better approach is to open access completely, identify those incredibly successful usages, then work with the developer accordingly on a mutually beneficial relationship. This way, applications are given full ability to grow and mature without arbitrary constraints.

Other APIs implement rate-limiting to protect the servers from unexpectedly high load. This is a legitimate risk which, if encountered, can adversely affect the performance of all users. That said, building complicated features into the system, such as rate-limiting, can be much more costly than configuring a scalable server architecture. Moreover, each request to the API will see slight latency increases as a result of the rate-limiting analysis. I know that latency is marginal, but why introduce any additional latency, especially when creating disincentives for developers?

Be Agile: Practice Iterative Development
Building your API over time has several benefits. First, it signals to the developer community that this API is meaningful to the provider and will continue to grow and get supported over time. This sounds trivial, but it is a very important part of the relationship with the community. If developers are not sure about your commitment to the API, are they likely to spend their own time building an application around it?

Another benefit of iterative development is that you do not have to get the API perfect the first time. I will qualify that by saying that, as a matter of principle, any release for an API should be done with the expectation that it will be supported for a long time. This is important because changes to existing API features will break the applications of those that use them. When I say the API doesn’t have to be perfect, I mean it does not have to be complete. New features can (and should) be added over time, extending its capability and making it more attractive for potential developers.

To put it another way, you will not have every detail of the API solved at the initial launch. It is much better to go live with the features that you know well while deferring those that you do not. Trying to cram in tenuous requirements will create headaches for you and for the community down the road. Spend the time necessary on figuring out the features, the supporting markup, the access and error methods, etc. before you commit to an API feature.

How to Make Money With Your API

By , December 10, 2012 8:30 pm

This post first appeared on ProgrammableWeb.com

One of the questions that I am most frequently asked regarding content APIs is “how can I make money with my API?” Before answering that question, however, it is important to ask for whom the API is designed. After all, the audiences for your API will determine what business opportunities exist.

The most common target audience for APIs is the developer community. While that audience is an interesting and potentially important one, it is not where the greatest value can be realized.

When we launched the NPR API in 2008, we established four target audiences, each of which were important. The target audiences were (and still are):

  • NPR: NPR is of highest importance because as we build all of our systems, mobile apps, etc., it was important to be as nimble and efficient as possible. We have adopted this so deeply that the API is the foundation of everything that we do, including acting as the content source to NPR.org.
  • NPR member stations: NPR member stations are a critical aspect of the NPR mission and business model. Offering the stations a new, more effective way to get NPR content in a robust way better serves the stations and their communities, as well as NPR.
  • NPR partners: Having the API quickly became a more effective way to interact with content aggregators, business partners and other commercial entities with whom we established relationships. In fact, the API became a business development tool where some external organizations approached us because we had a robust API.
  • the general public: Finally, as part of our public service mission, it was and is important for NPR to share our content with the world. Exposing it to the developer community is a natural extension of this effort. But when we launched the API, we fully expected this to be where true innovation took place with the API. In fact, the day after our launched, I told CNet that the community of “developers will come up with a lot of brilliant ideas.”

With the API live for a full two years, I decided to look more closely at how effectively the API has been serving these four audiences. Although I am not surprised by the results, you may be…

The following charts show the distribution of how many API keys are registered by each of our four audiences. That metric is then compared to the consumption of the API (as measured by API requests) by the four audiences:

Obviously, there are many more API keys registered to the general public than the others. In fact, our API currently has over 10 times more public keys than all other keys in the system combined.

Despite the disparity between public keys and those used by other audiences, the dominant group from a request perspective is overwhelmingly NPR, responsible for more than 92% of the total number of requests. That means that the remaining 8% of requests are coming from all three other target audiences combined.

When considering this distribution in requests by audience relative to the key distribution by audience, it is clear that NPR has by far been the most effective user of the API. So, given the incredible amount of consumption by NPR, how has that translated into revenue opportunities? Below is a chart detailing the growth in total page views across all NPR platforms over a twelve-month span:

By the end of the twelve months, NPR’s total page view growth has increased by more than 100%. How were we able to add that many page views in such a short amount of time? The API. Not directly. But the API did enable NPR product owners to quickly, efficiently and independently build specialized apps in various new platforms. As a result, what we have seen is primarily additive growth. In other words, in addition to NPR.org’s growth (by about 19%), we have been able to add the NPR News iPhone app, the improved mobile site, the Android app, the iPad app, etc., each of which adds page views. From our analysis, adding these new platforms is generating new traffic and is not cannibalizing page views from NPR.org in a substantive way. These new page views create new sponsorship/advertising inventory that create new revenue opportunities.

So, when asked the question “how can I make money with my content API?”, the answer should always be based on your target audiences. And from NPR’s experience, the best way to make money is to focus on how the API can improve your internal processes. Of course, it is still important to maintain a solid support and growth model for the other audiences as well, but we cannot all be Google, Netflix, Twitter, etc. Unless you are planning to spend a lot of money on community engagement, you are better served by making sure you can liberate your product owners and grow your business more quickly, efficiently and independently.

In other words, don’t assume that the API’s primary audience is the developer community. Question that default position and do the introspection that will enable you to get the maximum value out of your API.

Content Portability: Building an API is Not Enough

By , December 10, 2012 8:20 pm

This post first appeared on ProgrammableWeb.com

My previous posts focused on COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere) and content modularity, the fundamentals for ensuring that content can be managed and distributed to virtually any platform. But ensuring that your content can be delivered to those other platforms does not mean that it can display appropriately on them.

Content often contains very important semantic markup, used to emphasize the content, relate it to other content, describe it, etc. By markup, I mean HTML, character encodings and microformats, among others. Although this markup is important to the content, it also makes it “dirty”, potentially compromising its ability to live and flourish in the myriad places to which it will get distributed. No matter how modular the content is in the database, if it is sullied by this markup, it is not truly portable. As a result, just building an API is not enough. The API needs to be able to distribute the content to any platform in a way that each platform can handle.

To demonstrate this problem around portability, I often use the pre-iPhone iPod as an example. This device did not parse HTML. Rather, tags would simply be printed as strings. When podcasting took off, some NPR titles had HTML tags in them, including < em > and < strong >. Because iPods were not able to render the HTML, titles would like something like, “This is a < em >great< /em > title!” Similar, another fail scenario that is relevant to NPR is an HD Radio display. These devices are also not able to render markup printing these tags to the screen.

There are two primary ways of handling this problem. The more common way is to store the dirty content in the database and to maintain a series of scripts that handle it on the way out. Although this is potentially effective for specific goals, there are some significant problems with it. For starters, stripping out the markup as it gets distributed means that the markup still lives with the content in the database. As a result, as new platforms arise and as markup standards evolve, the markup in the content will remain static. So, each distribution script that handles the markup will need to be carefully maintained and updated accordingly. Moreover, since each distribution platform could have its own compliance with the various forms of markup, each of these outputs may require their own script to handle the content (that is, the more distribution channels there are, the more scripts there are to maintain). Finally, the majority of systems that allow markup in this way do very little to limit the type of markup that is used. Because of the tremendous variance in how the markup is used in the content, these scripts will need to be increasingly complex, causing the accuracy to be tougher to guarantee.

Rather than handling the cleansing process on the way out, NPR has created a system that cleans the content on the way in. The goal here is to save the content in the database in a modular AND portable way. That means that each discrete object type is stored separately while ensuring that text content in each object is devoid of markup. I call this system “Markup Addressing” and here is how it works:

  • A range of fields in the system are markup-enabled, allowing Editors and scripts to include HTML and other markup values in the content directly.
  • For each field that allows markup, very specific values are allowed. Some fields allow more, some less, but all fields are limited to nothing more than the 25 tags and character encodings that the system as a whole allows.
  • We apply client-side handling to ensure that no markup beyond those allowed by the field are used for that field. We also enforce proper nesting and syntax for the markup.
  • Before saving the clean and acceptable markup to the database, we identify all markup for each field and begin our “addressing”, which is essentially identifying the character numbers of the markup in the text. For each tag or character identified, we find the character position for where it starts. If applicable, we also find the character position for the close tag. We then strip out the markup from the text and store in a relational table the address in the text that the markup was found.
  • This relational table does not include the markup itself. Rather, that is stored in a separate table that is the authority for which tags are allowable. The image below represents roughly how we store this kind of information.

NPR Flow of Markup Through Content


The diagram above represents how NPR strips out markup from content fields prior to saving to the database. The markup is then “addressed” and stored in a series of relational tables, enabling any presentation layer to present the content with or without markup. It even allows the markup to be easily transformed as needed before pushing to different platforms. (Click here for an enlargement of this diagram)

There are several very tangible benefits to this approach, all of which improve overall portability of the content. These benefits include:

  • Distributing the content without any markup is as simple as pushing out the content from the database directly, without any further processing. This is helpful for platforms that are unable to render markup, including those mentioned in my examples above.
  • Distributing the content with the original markup is just as easy by reassembling the markup based on the addresses.
  • It is easy to only distribute only some of the markup based on what the markup is. An example of this is if the destination product wants to emphasize content but does not want to allow for links to other content.
  • As markup, such as HTML tags, get deprecated, this approach only requires a change to one field in the entire database, instead of having to cycle through the database to find all instances of the old tag to replace it with the new one. For example, < b > has been replaced with < strong >, so we simply need to modify the one record in the authority table for tags to make this change apply across the entire set of content.
  • As new platforms arise, if they require specialized markup, it is easy to transform the existing markup to anything else required for these new platforms.
  • Adding new allowable tags is easy by simply extending the client-side handling and the authority table. These tags can include microformats and other business-critical tags that help describe the content. For example, NPR could very easily create a tag for our internal purposes for < station >, such that for every station that gets tagged, rather than rendering this tag, the system will look up the station in our database and replace that < station > tag with a hyperlink to the station’s home page.

NPR’s system applies these methods to specific fields throughout our CMS. When distributing the content through the API, however, we only currently apply the power of Markup Addressing to the story full text. The API has a field for < text > which removes all markup for the syndication as well as < textWithHtml > which reassembles the content with all markup. Extending this to all other markup-enabled fields would be quite easy under this system, although there has not yet been a need to do so.

Regardless of which approach is taken, there is one other significant issue that prevents true portability of content… the content itself!

I create a distinction between “content” and “calls-to-action” to help clarify this problem. Content is the information that the users actually want to consume. It could also include metadata, which helps to accurately describe the content that the user is actually consuming. Within this content, applying markup that emphasizes it or relates it to other content should be done in such a way that the meaning of the content is unaltered by the abstraction of the markup from the content. Here is an example of an appropriate way to apply markup to the content:

NPR Example of Good Markup in Text

This image is part of an NPR story that demonstrates appropriate use of HTML within the body of the text. The artists’ names are linking to artist pages, but the meaning of the story is completely unaltered by the removal of the markup.

In this scenario, removing the links to the artists’ names in the text, for example, does not alter the meaning of the content. Of course, it does diminish some of its power as the user cannot easily learn more about these artists within the context of this story. That said, distribution of this content without those links will not adversely affect the meaning of the story. The artist names are valid and appropriate within the body of the text.

Applying markup within the content that is calling the users to perform an action, on the other hand, poses a different problem. Here is an example of a call-to-action within the content:

NPR Example of Bad Markup in Content

This image is part of the same NPR story demonstrating the use of calls-to-action, which make the content unable to provide meaning without the context of the markup. These calls-to-action make the content less portable, specifically to platforms that are not markup enabled.

Notice that within this content there is a link to related content where the link text is “Listen to The Entire Album”. Abstracting away the link itself actually alters the meaning of the text as the text provides no information about the audio asset. There is no indication as to what album or who the artist is. So, as this content gets distributed to platforms (both known and unknown), pulling out the markup actually adversely affects the content.

This is a problem for every content producer, including NPR. Although we have gone through great measures to put the content in the best position to live and thrive in all platforms, there is still work to be done to ensure the success of our distribution strategies. Some of these efforts are technical in nature. Others could impact editorial processes and style guides. But in all cases, our goals are the same… to be a media organization that produces great content for our users, wherever they wish to consume it.

Content Modularity: More Than Just Data Normalization

By , December 10, 2012 8:10 pm

This post first appeared on ProgrammableWeb.com

As discussed in my previous post, COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere) is a fundamental philosophy that drives NPR’s digital publishing and distribution strategy and is the foundation of the NPR API. Supporting it all is a single system that manages all incoming content and funnels it out through a single distribution pipe, regardless of content type or destination. A key principle that supports COPE is ensuring that content is stored in a modular way.

Modular storage of content is more than just database normalization. It requires strategic design of the data model to ensure that discreet objects are stored in distinct locations. To create the right design, you must truly understand your system and the assets that it stores. That is, you need to be able to identify and represent the object (or series of objects) that is at the core of your system. For NPR, the core of the system is a story. We then attach “resources” to the story, each of which is its own object in the database (examples of resources include full text with each paragraph stored as distinct records, audio, video, images, related links, and a range of other object types). Then stories get attached to lists, which are essentially a series of taxonomies that help our systems slice through the stories.

NPR Entity Diagram

The diagram above is a basic entity diagram of how NPR manages data for a story, some related resources and the list to which the stories are assigned. This is a conceptual model that represents how these entities relate to each other and does not include all resource or list entities in the system. The physical model, obviously, is much more complex. Click here for a larger and more complete view of this diagram (PDF).

NPR’s system is obviously much more complicated than this, but the breakdown of story/resources/lists is the foundation of it all. Accordingly, storage of this information in the database needs to ensure that all of these objects can be manipulated independently. With this approach, NPR is able to create a list of all images in the system, or all stories that have video, or all stories in the News topic, or any number of other combinations of stories or resources. The power of this modularity is that we have tremendous control over what gets distributed to each destination. And the distribution of content for all of these scenarios is the same simple REST-based API, requiring no special coding to generate the content for the different destinations.

NPR Sample XML Output

The above is an excerpt of XML outputted from the NPR API. Clean, effective storage of the content makes it a simpler and more flexible process to manage it differently as it gets distributed to different destinations. Click here to see an expanded view of the XML with annotation detailing how it maps to the entity diagram.

Conversely, WPT’s tend to store objects to enable the building of a web page. As a result, the content may be bundled together in database fields, storing the actual references to images, video and audio entirely within the story content text. It is still possible that the WPT’s are adhering to some form of data normalization in their storage techniques, but that does not mean that these systems are embracing COPE.

There are two significant problems with the WPT approach of data storage. First, as an example, the image references within the block of text will contain HTML and possibly other markup, making the text block dirty. Any distribution to other platforms could then require special treatment to prepare the content for that destination. More importantly, however, is the fact that these same images are very difficult to repurpose because they are embedded in text. So, it would be quite a challenge to make a feed of images, to identify only those posts that contain images, to resize some or all images in the system, or to consistently restrict distribution of images that do not have the rights cleared.

Building systems that manage the content in a modular way and separates it from display sets it up well to be distributed on a range of platforms. The final piece to the puzzle, however, is content portability. Content portability ensures that the content can actually live and thrive in all platforms to which it gets distributed (even those that do not yet exist). Building a distribution channel, like an API, is simply not enough anymore. Content portability must be applied at the CMS level, which will be the topic of my next article.

COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere

By , December 10, 2012 8:00 pm

This post first appeared on ProgrammableWeb.com.

The digital media world is in the process of dramatic change. For years, the Internet has been about web sites and browser-based experiences, and the systems that drove those sites generally matched those experiences. But now, the portable world is upon us and it is formidable. With the growing need and ability to be portable comes tremendous opportunity for content providers. But it also requires substantial changes to their thinking and their systems. It requires distribution platforms, API’s and other ways to get the content to where it needs to be. But having an API is not enough. In order for content providers to take full advantage of these new platforms, they will need to, first and foremost, embrace one simple philosophy: COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere).

NPR Architecture Diagram

The diagram above represents NPR’s content management pipeline and how it embraces these COPE principles. The basic principle is to have content producers and ingestion scripts funnel content into a single system (or series of closely tied systems). Once there, the distribution of all content can be handled identically, regardless of content type or its destinations (Click here for an enlargement of this diagram).

COPE
Through COPE, our systems have enabled incredible growth despite having a small staff and limited resources. Although the CMS is home-grown, COPE itself is agnostic as to the build or buy/integrate decision. Any system that adheres to these principles, whether it is a COTS product, home-grown, or anything in between, will see the benefits of content modularity and portability.

In this series of posts, I will be discussing these philosophies, as well as how NPR applied them and how we were able to do so much with so little (including our NPR API).

COPE is really a combination of several other closely related sub-philosophies, including:

Build content management systems (CMS), not web publishing tools (WPT)

  • Separate content from display
  • Ensure content modularity
  • Ensure content portability

These philosophies have a direct impact on API and distribution strategies as well. Creating an API on top of a COPE-less system will distribute the content, but there is still no guarantee that the content can actually live on any platform. COPE is dependent on these other philosophies to ensure that the content is truly portable.

Build CMS, not WPT
COPE is the key difference between content management systems and web publishing tools, although these terms are often used interchangeably in our industry. The goal of any CMS should be to gather enough information to present the content on any platform, in any presentation, at any time. WPT’s capture content with the primary purpose of publishing web pages. As a result, they tend to manage the content in ways focused on delivering it to the web. Plug-ins are often available for distribution to other platforms, but applying tools on top of the native functions to manipulate the content for alternate destinations makes the system inherently unscalable. That is, for each new platform, WPT’s will need a new plug-in to tailor the presentation markup to that platform. CMS’s, on the other hand, store the content cleanly, enabling the presentation layers to worry about how to display the content not on how to transform the markup embedded within it.

True CMS’s are really just content capturing tools that are completely agnostic as to how or where the content will be viewed, whether it is a web page, mobile app, TV or radio display, etc. Additionally, platforms that don’t yet exist are able to be served by a true CMS in ways that WPT’s may not be able to (even with plug-ins). By applying COPE, NPR was able to quickly jump on advancements throughout the years like RSS, Podcasts, API’s and mobile platforms with relative ease. As an example, the public API took only about two developer months to create, and most of that time was spent on user and rights management.

This presentation shows the same NPR story displayed in a wide range of platforms. The content, through the principles of COPE, is pushed out to all of these destinations through the NPR API. Each destination, meanwhile, uses the appropriate content for that presentation layer.

Separate Content from Display
Separating content from display is one of the key concepts supporting COPE. In the most basic form, this means that the presentation layer needs to be a series of templates that know how to pull in the content from the repository. This enables the presentation layer to care about how the content will look while the content can be display-agnostic, allowing it to appear on a web site, a mobile device, etc.

But to truly separate content from display, the content repository needs to also avoid storing “dirty” content. Dirty content is content that contains any presentation layer information embedded in it, including HTML, XML, character encodings, microformats, and any other markup or rich formatting information. This separation is achieved by the two other principles, content modularity and content portability

At a high level, many systems and organizations are applying the basics of COPE. They are able to distribute content to different platforms, separate content from display, etc. But to take some of these systems to the next level, enabling them to scale and adapt to our changing landscape, they will need to focus more on content modularity and portability. In my next post, I will go into more detail about NPR’s approach to content modularity and why our approach is more than just data normalization.

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